super mom

 
 

Grammar

The pronoun

每 

měi  

covers the meanings of "each" and "every." It should normally be used with a measure words and used with 都  dōu   in a complete sentence.

 

每个人都喜欢他们的妈妈。

mĕigerén dōu xĭhuan tāmende māma.

Everyone likes his or her own mother.

 

中国的每个城市我都去过。

zhōngguó de mĕigè chéngshì wŏdōu qùguò 。

I’ve been to every city in city.

 

 

Verb/adjective

不 

bù   

verb/adjective A common way to form questions in Chinese is to use a verb or an adjective in the positive first, then repeat the same verb or the adjective in its negative form. It’s similar to that in English when we can say, "Do you have money or not?" or "Have you or have you not been to the park?" This sentence pattern is a lot more natural in Chinese than those admittedly awkward English equivalents, however.

 

你喜不喜欢看电视?

nĭ xĭbùxĭhuan kàn diànshì ?

Do you like watching TV or not?

 

学中文难不难?

xuézhōngwén nánbùnán ?

Is it hard to learn Chinese?

 

 

In Chinese, verbs can be reduplicated to indicate the actions happening briefly or "a little bit."

 

你问问妹妹想不想吃饭。

nĭ wènwen mèimei xiăngbùxiăng chīfàn 。

Ask your sister if she wants to eat.

 

我看看你在做什么。

wŏ kànkan nĭzài zuòshénme 。

Let me have a look at what you are doing.

 

 

The 把  bǎ   sentence is a useful structure for focusing on the result or influence of an action. It's really common in Mandarin, but English speakers will feel a bit strange at first. The structure is Subj.+ 把  bǎ  + Obj+ verb phrase

 

把脸洗了。

bă liăn xĭle 。

Wash your face!

 

把饭吃了。

bă fàn chīle 。

Have you food!